The Most Stolen Vehicles in the US in 2019

It looks like car thieves had a new favorite last year.

The 2019 Hot Wheels report is out and it looks like car thieves had a new favorite last year.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau uses crime data from across the country to create the report. In 2018, the Honda Civic was the top target of theft, but in 2019 thieves sought a higher dollar heist in the Ford Full Size Pick-Up.

The top 10 cars stolen in 2019 were: 

10. Honda CR-V, stolen 10,094 times. The most popular year, the 2001.

9. GMC Full Size Pick-Up, with 11,164 thefts, mostly the 2018.

8. Full Size Dodge Pick-Up, 11,292 thefts, primarily the 2001.

7. Toyota Corolla, 12,137 thefts, mostly the, 2018 model

6. Nissan Altima, stolen 13,355 times, 2015 the hottest year. 

5. Toyota Camry, swiped 15,656 times, mostly the 2007.

4. Honda Accord, stolen 30,745 times, the 1997 is still the favorite. 

3. Chevrolet Pick-Up (Full Size), cracking the top three this year with 32,583, mostly the 2004

2. Honda Civic, dropping out of the top spot with only 33,220, mostly the 2000.

1. Full-Size Ford Pick-Up, stolen 38,938 times, typically the 2006 

More than 2,500 Ford Full Size pickups were stolen last year, but that wasn't necessarily what made it the hottest commodity. Really thieves just stole a lot less Civics, about 5,200 less than in 2018.

When it comes to the specific model, the 2000 Honda Civic had the most thefts followed by the 1997 Honda Accord. Which should shut down anyone that uses the "no one wants my car anyways" methodology when choosing not to lock their car. 

In 2019, the top three model years stolen were 2018 vehicles (47,859 thefts), followed by 2019 models (45,188 thefts), and 2017 models (39,425 thefts).

Once again, the NICB recommended four layers of protection to keep your vehicle safe, including: 

  • Tracking Devices that use GPS and wireless technologies to remotely monitor your vehicle.
  • Immobilizing Devices, like smart keys, kill switches, starter, ignition, and fuel pump disablers and wireless ignition authentication. 
  • Warning Devices, such as the standard audible alarms, steering column collars and pedal locks. 
  • And finally, my favorite, common sense. Close your windows, lock your doors and, if you remember, take the keys out of the ignition. 

If possible, park in a well-lit areas as well. 

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